Living One’s Life with Free Will

Greetings Beloved Ones,

We have touched upon the topic of Free Will previously, but we are going to address the concept again as it is a very important idea that cannot be understood too deeply.

Free Will is the intrinsic right of each being on the earth plane to make choices or non-choices as the person decides.  Each lifetime is written and directed by the choices or non-choices made by the individual and that person bears the responsibility of the choices and non-choices made.

One brings many different things into each lifetime.  Each lifetime is different; one’s higher self develops the blue print for this lifetime and so different factors affect each lifetime.  Whatever those factors are, whatever goals for learning and growth and enlightenment may exist, the most important factor in your lifetime is that of Free Will.

Some are confused at the idea of non-choice.  Some insist that when presented with intolerable situations how can they be held responsible for the outcomes of what occurred?  Were they supposed to die instead of suffering through a situation?  How would death benefit them?

Your societies on earth have made death seem such a tragic event, yet we know that this is not true.  Death is not the end of all there is; death is but a transition out of this dream called Earth Life and a return to the energetic reality of All that Is.  We do not understand why one would choose to make unethical choices or tolerate unethical behavior simply to maintain a status quo or even to gain a “better” lifestyle, but it is not our choice, it is not our decision.  We are here to Support and Guide as we can.

But yes, even a forced non-choice is still a choice.  Subterfuge may be necessary for someone to stay alive, but how can one turn that dishonorable and unethical situation into a beneficial situation?  How can one grow and learn and still be filled with the Light through making selfish choices?  It is the framework of those choices that matter and it is what takes place outside those choices that matter.

Perhaps you turn your back on a bullying situation because you need your job.  Your family depends upon you to provide for them and you know that if you report someone to management the only thing that will happen is you will lose your job.  So – you make a non-choice and look the other way.  That is the action inside of the work environment.  So what do you do after that?  One possible step is to look for another job and then when you leave you leave a report of all that took place.

Maybe, because you saw the other person was hurting, you help the person in some way – such as lightening their work load because you know they must be under tremendous stress.  Perhaps you take them out to lunch as you know their money is short and you pay for both your lunches.  Small things can make a big thing better.  Anonymous help can also provide assistance to those you are not aiding through direct action while not necessarily placing yourself in jeopardy.

So many individuals on the earth plane have succumbed to apathy; instead of just noting an event, step forward and do something about it.  Find your Inner Light and your Inner Voice and USE your Free Will actively – for regardless of what you do or do not do your life is being written by you.  Don’t wake up 20 years down the road in a pity poo poo pile saying “poor me, I hate my life, how did I get here” because YOU are responsible for your choices and your non-choices.  We love you and will support you always, but this is something that is important for you to understand.

Our friend Jeshua has a story he would like to share now to help you understand Free Will better.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~

In a village, a young mother dies leaving a small, five year old boy alone in the world.  The village is like many others and barely acknowledges the boy or his needs.  He has learned enough to forage food for himself and to start a fire to keep himself alive, but he moves into the woods nearby because the villagers won’t help him at all.  In the woods he can find what he needs and he discovers a small indention in the rocks he calls his “cave”.  Here, he builds his fires and keeps himself warm, and catches rabbits, digs roots, and picks herbs from the plants around him.

The village quickly forgets about his as soon as his sad, dirty face disappears.

Several years later, a man comes to the village seeking the woman and their child.  Discovering that the village has neglected to care for his child after his wife’s death enrages him and he beats the village elder unconscious.

The village turns its back onto the man and rushes to the elder’s side to tend to him.  The man goes out into the woods and slowly hunts the child down.  The child is emaciated, scarred, and wounded from casual and not-so-casual encounters with the local flora and fauna.  He speaks softly to the child of his mother and explains that he is his father, who had been off to war for many years, protecting the village from raiders.  The village had sent him as one of their representatives and the elder had agreed, as compensation for the risk, to look and care after the mother and child until he returned.

He helps his son gather the things he values and tells him that they are going on a long trip but will eventually be living in an environment where he will be cared for properly and taught skills and knowledge that would help him achieve success in the world.

Many years go by.  The boy becomes a man and indeed, becomes successful.  His life in the wilderness alone has receded into a dim memory until one day his father dies.  His father requests that he return his ashes back to the village where he was born so he can rest comfortably with his ancestors.  The young man reflects upon his father’s life and decides he needs to honor his father by returning his ashes to the village.  This trip will mean much discomfort from many weeks of traveling, yet it is important to him to honor the man who raised and cared for him for so many years.  This vibrant, young man from the city is unrecognizable from that sad, little boy they had last seen many years ago.

He gathers some friends and family and asks them to join him on the trip to honor his father.  As he travels, small memories rise to the surface of his mind; laughing with his mother as they foraged for food, watching her sewing rabbit pelts together to make winter clothing, and eventually, watching the light in his mother’s eyes fade as she convulsed on the ground from the wounds her attacker inflicted.

The boy-now-man is racked with grief and wonders if these are true memories or if they are the imaginings of a small child.

He and his party arrive in the village many weeks later.  They are accustomed to camping along the way as the villages are few and the inns to rent a bed are fewer.  The village looks as if it has seen better days in the past and the prosperity dominant in the city they live in not present.

He surveys the village and realizes not only how it has not grown, but that it is actually quite stagnant.  He finds and makes small talk with the village shopkeeper; she has few enough goods to sell but they will need supplies for the return trip and so he purchases what she has available.  They talk about how sad the village is now and how bustling it had been decades past.

He leaves his group outside the village square to find a place to set up for the night while he sets off to complete his task.  Memories flash into his mind.  Memories of them taking his mother’s body away and throwing it into a pit.  Memories of the elder turning his back on the young boy, telling him that he was not welcome in the village.  The young city man becomes unsettled emotionally as he continues his short journey around the village and into the woods.

Eventually he finds his way to the area he had lived in the woods.  There is little to discover there and he has doubts about whether he is in the correct spot.  He sits for a few more minutes, allowing himself some time to remember his younger life and then makes his way to the graveyard to complete the task that brought him there.  Even the graveyard looks decrepit and sad.  He spots an old man sitting in a chair against the wall of a nearby building and approaches him.

He respectfully chats with the man and discovers that the old man tends the graveyard and has done so for almost 40 years.  He has asked for help from the village elder as he has no apprentice and is physically challenged with the tasks nowadays, but sadly he relates the village elder’s refusal that no one has time for the “superstitious nonsense” of honoring one’s family and suggests all bodies should be thrown into a pit to rot instead.

The young city man shakes his head sadly and agrees that some people do not understand that the proper honoring of one’s family is integral to a person’s character.  He then asks about the rough dirt on the other side of the cemetery walls.  The old man explains that the pit is for those of bad character or strangers whose characters they cannot attest to.  Only those known of good character are allowed to be buried in the graveyard.

The young city man returns to the village where he had left his group and finds that a middle aged man has joined them, asking questions about the group and their journey.  He tells the man that they are just passing through on family business and will be leaving in the morning.  He asks the man who he is and the man identifies himself as the village elder.  He elaborates that he has been village elder for over 25 years and relates with relish the story of how the previous elder had been beaten to death by a man with no reason.

The young man from the city well knows the history between his father and the previous elder; when he had reached the age of maturity his father had laid out all the details before him.  He questions the elder closely on the story, looking long into the man’s face as he speaks.

The elder is a loud and boisterous man, who likes to hear his own voice.  He relates with relish that he was made elder while he was 25 years old because he was the previous elder’s kin and most of the men in the village had been killed during the war.  He speaks of his own self importance and how the village would be gone completely if not for him.

He let the man ramble on at length, allowing him to revel in his self-importance as the man from the city waited for the memory niggling at the back of his mind to finally emerge.  As the man slowly ran out of steam, he began to talk.  He told the elder who he was and explained clearly to the man the reason for his visit was to drop off his father’s ashes to his family’s gravesite.  The elder understood finally, who the stranger was and roared at him in outrage.

The majority of the village was paying attention to this exchange.  Old men and women alike came to their doors and windows when the city visitor had started speaking.  Those old enough to have treated the little boy poorly stood with their eyes cast down, afraid to look at the city man who had once been one of their own.  They could see from the city man’s demeanor and dress that he was educated and successful, and if they had treated him kindly he might have been willing to help the village during its time of distress now.

The village elder continued to rant at the man, discounting the agreement the village had made to the young men sent off to war and arguing that no one had harmed him directly.  The city man explained to the elder that he remembered everything that had happened to him all those years ago, including how the village had treated him when he was vulnerable and alone.

Calmly, he stood up and smacked the village elder hard across the face; the village elder flew back and lay stunned on the ground, holding his bloody lip with his hand.

“You lie too much and are rife with dishonor,” said the city man.  He addressed the village in a strong, but quiet voice.  “This ‘elder’ of yours is a liar and a killer.  His father allowed him to stay in the village instead of going with the rest of the young men to fight in the war because he was afraid to lose the son he had spoilt.

Then, once my father was gone, the elder’s son harassed my mother continually, until one night he broke into our small home, abused her, and left her to die.  His father the elder came and dragged my mother’s body out and threw her into the pit to hide his own son’s crimes, and the elder told me to leave as no one will help me.  The elder turned his back multiple times on the agreements of assistance he made with my father.

Eventually my father returned, my father learned the truth of what happened and he meted out the punishment deserved.  Your village elder received the punishment that your entire village earned for being dishonorable and living lies.  His own son, after taking on the mantle of village elder, also has not lived up to the responsibilities inherent with that role and position, and he continues his father’s legacy of being dishonorable and a liar.

And you each share the fault.  Each of you knew about the agreements made.  Each of you turned your eyes away and your backs onto the situation once the men had left for war.  And now you get to live with this village “elder” in a village that is dying – all due to your own choices.  Do not worry – I am not going to do anything further to him or to this village.  You will reap what you have sown – all those many years ago through today.

The young man turned his back on the village and the village elder and left them all to deal with the Truth he had brought into the Light.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

In this story there are many instances of choices and non-choices.  We cannot tell you what the ‘correct’ choice is or was because there is no ‘correct’ choice.  There is choice and non-choice and both have ramifications and benefits.

Each person is responsible for their own Free Will choices regardless of what the circumstances are surrounding a situation.  If you believe otherwise, you are lying to yourself.  We will still love you, but the lies you tell yourself are just as damaging as the lies you tell to others.

We beseech you – free yourself from the lies you are telling yourself and embrace the Truth; it may be hard at first, but it gets easier very quickly and it will change your life.

Blessings to you, Beloved Ones.

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